Tag Archives: Winter Wheat

The last crop progress report for September shows a brisk row crop harvest starting to set up. Along with a steady increase in winter wheat drilling and emergence. The one thing that stands out somewhat is a slight increase in pasture and range condition while soil moisture continues to decrease.

At the top of the report is the corn crop. 75% of the national crop has reached full maturity, keeping a nice 10% lead to the five year average. Nebraska corn has reached 80% maturity, 15% ahead of the five year average and 15% increase from last week. Kansas corn has reached 84% maturity. Just 3% ahead of the five year average.

15% of the US corn crop is out of the field and in the bin as harvest progresses 7% week to week. Nebraska corn is 14% harvested. That is up 4% from the five year average. Kansas has harvested 29% of their corn crop. That is actually 6% behind the five year average, but is 5% ahead of where corn harvest was a year ago. Iowa has harvested 12% of their corn. That more than doubles the five year average for Iowa at 5%.

Nationwide the corn condition remains unchanged week to week at 61% good to excellent. Nebraska corn dropped 1% to 63% good to excellent. Kansas corn actually increased 1% to 55% good to excellent. Illinois and Iowa corn remained unchanged from last week at 73% and 42% good to excellent respectively.

Now to the soybean crop, where we start with soybeans dropping leaves. 74% of the of the nations soybean crop has dropped leaves. That is 5% ahead of the five year average, but 25% ahead of where soybean dropping leaves were a year ago. Largely due to getting planted earlier this year. 92% of Nebraska soybeans have dropped their leaves tying them with Louisiana for the most leaves dropped. Kansas soybeans have dropped 68% of their leaves.   Both are well ahead of their five year average.

With leaves dropping rapidly soybean harvest is underway increasing 14% from last week to 20% harvested this week. That is 5% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska has harvested 29% of their soybeans. 16% ahead of the five year average. Kansas doubled their five year average for soybean harvest at 10%.

While corn condition remained unchanged soybean condition nationwide improved 1% to 64% good to excellent. Nebraska soybeans dropped 5% to 61% good to excellent. Kansas soybeans offset Nebraska improving 5% to 50% good to excellent. Iowa soybeans decreased 1% to 47% good to excellent. Illinois soybeans improved 1% to 72% good to excellent.

Sugar beet harvest is rolling along with 21% of the crop out of the ground. That is 4% ahead of the five year average and 6% ahead of where it was a year ago. Nebraska doesn’t have enough acres of sugar beets to make the national crop progress report.

Sorghum harvest is chugging along with 31% of the national crop harvested. That is 2% behind the five year average. Nebraska has harvested 7% of the sorghum crop. That is also 2% behind the five year average. Texas has the most sorghum harvested with 85% of the crop in the bin.

Sorghum condition nationwide is rated 51% good to excellent, unchanged from last week. Nebraska sorghum is rated 58% good to. That adds another 8% to it’s recent decline in condition.

While some are in combines with harvest others are in tractors putting in the 2021 winter wheat crop. 35% of the winter wheat crop is planted across the country. That is 2% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska has planted 60% of it’s winter wheat acres, actually placing it 6% behind the five year average. Kansas has planted 35% of the states winter wheat acres. A full 10% ahead of the five year average.

Winter wheat is also starting to emerge with 10% of the crop emerged across the country. Nebraska winter wheat is suffering from dry conditions with only 15% of the crop emerged. 12% behind five year average. Kansas winter wheat is 10% emerged, 3% ahead of the five year average.

The somewhat surprise in the report comes with the last three segments. Typically when pasture and range conditions improve that means soil moisture improves, but that’s not quite the case this week. Nebraska pasture and range improved 1% to 41% good to excellent. Kansas pasture and range improved 2% to 39% good to excellent.

Meanwhile topsoil moisture in Nebraska dropped 8% to 40% adequate to surplus and 20% very short. Nebraska subsoil moisture dropped 7% to 55% adequate to surplus. Kansas topsoil moisture dropped 12% to 51% adequate to surplus and 12% very short. Kansas subsoil moisture dropped 2% to 42% adequate to surplus.

You can see the full report here:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/jm215d05v/0z709k99c/prog4020.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the full report here:

While the markets took a wild ride on Monday the NASS crop progress report looks fairly uneventful. Row crop harvest is getting started somewhat ahead of the five year average. That has been expected by many though given the early and swift planting that occurred. After big double digit increases in the soil moisture profile last week dry conditions have set back in and are slowly taking the soil moisture down.

In a full breakdown of the report we start with corn in the dent stage. It’s essientially complete across the country this week at 95%. That is up 6% from last week and still 5% ahead of the five year average. 97% of Nebraska corn is in the dent stage, 96% of Kansas corn is in the dent stage and 94% of Iowa corn is in the dent stage. All just a few points ahead of the five year average.

Corn maturity is also moving along swiftly with a nationwide rating of 59%. That is an 18% increase in the mature corn from a week ago. It’s also perfectly 10% ahead of the five year average. In the Midwest; 93% of the Nebraska corn crop is mature, 81% of the Kansas corn crop is mature and 66% of the Iowa corn crop is mature. All of these are ahead of their respective five year average, except Kansas which is 1% behind the five year average.

Corn harvest slowly moves along in the country up 3% nationwide from last week to 8% complete. Unlike the rest of the corn stages harvest is actually behind the five year average of 10%. Texas is by far the farthest along in corn harvest with 69% of the crop out of the field. Nebraska has 10% of the corn harvested. Iowa has 4% of the corn harvested. All these states are still ahead of their five year average. Kansas on the other hand has harvested 16% of their corn crop is 6% behind the five year average.

Finally with corn the overall condition of the crop remains little changed from last week. Nationwide the crop ticked up 1% to 61% good to excellent. Nebraska corn increased 3% to 63% good to excellent. Kansas corn remains unchanged week to week at 54% good to excellent. Iowa corn also remains unchanged week to week at 42% good to excellent.  Illinois corn follows the Nebraska plan with corn conditions rising 3% to 73% good to excellent.

Staying with row crops soybean dropping leaves is now considered 59% complete across the country. That helps it stay 9% ahead of the five year average. 82% of the Nebraska soybean crop has dropped leaves, 48% of the Kansas soybean crop has dropped leaves and 66% of the Iowa soybean crop has dropped leaves. All of these are well ahead of their five year average.

Soybean harvest is also now far enough along to be recognized by crop progress. Nationwide 6% of the soybean crop has been harvested. That is fully steady with the 5 year average. In Nebraska 10% of the soybean crop has been harvested. Iowa, 7% of the soybean crop has been harvested and in Kansas 2% of the soybean crop has been harvested. All of these are well ahead of the five year average of Kansas takes the cake doubling their five year average for soybean harvest.

Just as corn soybean condition rating is relatively unchanged week to week. Nationally the soybean crop is rated 63% good to excellent, unchanged week to week. Also remaining unchanged week to week is Illinois soybeans at 71% good to excellent and Iowa soybeans at 48% good to excellent.  Nebraska soybeans actually increased 2% week to week at 66% good to excellent. Kansas was one of the few states to see an actual decrease in soybean conditions with a drop of 6% to 45% good to excellent.

Now to sorghum. Sorghum maturity continues to be ahead of the  five year average with a national rating of 51% mature, 3% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska sorghum has reached 49% maturity. A solid 13% ahead of the five year average.

Sorghum harvest is starting to get underway. Nationwide 27% of the sorghum crop is out of the field. That is 2% behind the five year average. In Nebraska 2% of the sorghum crop is harvested. 1% behind the five year average.

Nationwide the sorghum crop is rated 51% good to excellent, down 1% from last week. In Nebraska the sorghum crop is rated 66% good to excellent. A sharp 6% decline from last week.

Winter wheat continues to go into the ground with 20% of the national crop planted. Just 1% ahead of five year average. Nebraska is well ahead of the Kansas at 40% planted. Kansas is 14% planted.

Winter wheat is also starting to emerge with 3% of the national crop above ground. 1% of the Kansas crop has emerged and 0% of the Nebraska crop has emerged.

After big gains last week pasture and range conditions fall this week. Kansas range condition fell 4% to 37% good to excellent. Nebraska pasture condition fell 1% to 40% good to excellent.

Soil moisture was also tightened this week due to dry conditions re-emerging. In Nebraska the topsoil rating dropped 6% to 48% adequate to surplus and the subsoil rating dropped 3% to 44% adequate to surplus. In Kansas topsoil moisture was unchanged week to week at 63% adequate to surplus, subsoil moisture actually increased 2% to 62% good to excellent.

You can see the USDA report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/2227nd802/h415q0669/prog3920.pdf 

Clay Patton recaps the report here:

 

The mid September crop progress report from NASS shows a substantial jump in moisture ratings from last week’s cool rain event. There is also a notable increase in pasture and range conditions due to the moisture. Aside from that the corn and soybean crop remain relatively unchanged and still well ahead of schedule when compared to the 5 year averages in most categories.

Starting at the top of the report which is now corn in the dent stage where 89% of the country has reached. That is 7% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska has reached 94% dent stage, Kansas has reached 91% and Iowa corn has reached 90% dent stage. All of those well ahead of their respective five year averages.

Corn maturity is also well ahead nationwide at 41%. The five year average is 32%. Iowa and Nebraska almost double their corn maturity five year averages at 48% & 49% respectively. Kansas on the other hand actually fell 1 % behind it’s five year average for corn maturity to 49% mature.

With that much of the corn crop already mature harvest is getting underway in several states. As an aggregate the national corn harvest is considered 5% complete. Right on track with the five year average. Texas of course is the furthest along with corn harvest at 67% complete. Nebraska has harvested 4% of the state’s corn crop that is 3% ahead of the five year average. Kansas though is again behind in corn harvesting with only 8% of the crop picked, 3% behind the five year average.

As the case has been for the last several week’s corn condition in the country continues to decline. Nationwide the corn crop is rated 60% good to excellent. Down 1% from last week. Nebraska and Iowa also dropped 1% to 61% and 42% good to excellent. Kansas corn increased 1% to 54% good to excellent. Illinois not to be outdone by Kansas increased 2% in the corn condition to 72% good to excellent.

Now to the soybean crop where 37% of the nations crop has dropped leaves. That is 6% ahead of the five year average. As for Nebraska 61% of the soybean crop has dropped leaves. That is perfectly 20% ahead of Iowa who has dropped leaves on 41% of the soybean crop. Either way both states are double digits ahead of their five year averages. Kansas soybeans dropping leaves is now at 32% complete. That is ahead of the five year average of 19%.

Soybean condition like corn dropped this week across the country to 63% good to excellent. Down 2% from last week. Nebraska and Iowa soybeans though bucked the trend and increased 1% apiece to 64% and 48% good to excellent. Kansas soybeans remained unchanged on the week at 51% good to excellent. Illinois though outdid all these states again with their soybeans improving 3% to 71% good to excellent.

Poor mans corn or one of the hottest commodities currently for China is sorghum. 39% of the US sorghum crop has reached maturity. That is even with the five year average. In Nebraska sorghum maturity is 9% ahead of the five year average at 26%.

Sorghum condition seems to have more elasticity than corn or soybeans. Nationwide the sorghum crop is rated 52% good to excellent, up 3% from last week. Nebraska though saw a 14% increase in it’s sorghum condition rating to 71% good to excellent.

Last week’s rain helped to bring the pasture and range condition back around in Nebraska. Nebraska pasture and range improved from 25% good to excellent to 41% good to excellent this week. Kansas pasture and range remained unchanged week to week at 41% good to excellent.  Looking around the country West Virginia actually did nearly the opposite of Nebraska with their pasture and range condition falling 11% week to week at 67% good to excellent.

Topsoil and subsoil moisture both seem to benefit from last week’s moisture as well. Nebraska topsoil moisture improved 17% to 54% adequate to surplus. Kansas topsoil moisture improved 19% to 63% adequate to surplus. Subsoil moisture in Nebraska is now rated 47% adequate to surplus. An increase of 14% from last week. Kansas subsoil moisture improved 8% from last week to 60% adequate to surplus.

You can see the full report from NASS here:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/qr46rp789/2r36vm941/prog3820.pdf

Clay Patton breaks down the full report here: