Tag Archives: Soybeans Blooming

The second half of July is looking to have a friendlier forecast for crops. This combined with last week’s moisture and heat helped to keep corn conditions nationwide unchanged week to week. Soybean conditions increased 1% week to week. Winter wheat harvest seems to be hitting a slight speed bump as it moves North. Pasture and range condition continues to deteriorate and soil moisture levels are mixed.

For corn the heat is helping keep development ahead of schedule. Nationwide 59% of the corp is silking. That is 5% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska’s corn crop is now 61% silked. Kansas corn has reached 66% silk. That is 2%-3% ahead of the five year average.

Corn in the dough stage tripled week to week from 3% to 9% nationwide. Nebraska is only half way to it’s five year average at 3%. Kansas corn on the other hand is nearly double it’s five year average at 25% in the dough stage.

Corn condition nationwide remained unchanged at 69% good to excellent. Kansas increased 1% week to week to 54% good to excellent. Texas and Illinois corn increased 2%. South Dakota corn increased 2%.  Nebraska decreased 4% to 66% good to excellent. Iowa fell another 2% to 81% good to excellent. Indiana remained unchanged week to week at 59% good to excellent.

Soybeans crossed the halfway threshold for blooming. According to NASS 64% of the national soybean crop has now bloomed. That is up from last week’s 48% and 7% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska soybeans are now 75% in bloom. Kansas soybeans in bloom are 11% ahead of the five year average at 55%.

Nationwide 25% of the soybeans have set pods. That is up 14% from last week. Nebraska has reached 31% setting pods on it’s soybeans. That is more than double it’s five year average of 15%. Kansas soybeans have set pods on 15% of the crop. That is up 4% from the five year average.

Some analysts expected soybean conditions to continue decreasing, but NASS believes the crop improved slightly week to week. Nationwide the soybean crop improved 1% to 69% good to excellent. Iowa soybeans decreased 1% to 82% good to excellent, Kansas soybeans dropped 2% to 57% good to excellent, Nebraska fell 2% go 71% good to excellent. North Dakota was able to tick up 1% to 69% good to excellent. Illinois may have seen one of the largest changes week to week up 8% to 67% good to excellent.

Sorghum condition also increased week to week. Nationwide the sorghum crop was rated up 5% to 51% good to excellent. Nebraska sorghum improved 3% good to excellent.

Winter wheat harvest seems to have hit a little bit of a speed bump as it wraps up in southern states and moves further north. Nationwide 74% of winter wheat harvest is complete. That is now 1% behind the five year average. Nebraska is 79% complete with winter wheat harvest. That is 13% ahead of the five year average. Kansas is synced with it’s five year average at 97% complete. Further to the North Washington is 11% behind the five year average at 5% complete. Montana is 6% behind the five year average at 3% complete.

The heat continues to take it’s toll on pasture and range. In Nebraska pasture and range decreased 3% to 45% good to excellent. Kansas pasture and range decreased 3% to 38% good to excellent.

Topsoil moisture was able to recharge in Kansas last week. According to NASS Kansas topsoil increased 6% to 61% adequate to surplus. Nebraska topsoil decreased 1% to 52% adequate to surplus.

Subsoil moisture was similar to topsoil moisture, with Kansas increase 5% to 60% adequate to surplus. Nebraska decreased 3% to 57% adequate to surplus.

You can see the full crop progress report here:

https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/sf268t43v/1831d650j/prog3020.pdf

Clay Patton recaps the full report here:

Following hot and dry conditions mixed rain showers were welcomed by farmers across the Midwest this past weekend. That helped to bring around the corn and soybean conditions from the previous week. Winter wheat harvest was able to keep pace with the 5 year average. Topsoil moisture was also able to increase in several states that were starting to become pretty dry.

Corn planting and emergence is considered complete across the country. That means that corn is now in or nearly in the silking stage. According to NASS 2% of the national corn crop is silking. That is on pace with the five year average. Kansas has 3% silking. Which is about 3% from the five year average. Nebraska has yet to see any corn enter the silking stage. Texas has the most corn silking at 55%. That is 5% ahead of the five year average.

As for the national corn condition it improved 1% week to week to 72% good to excellent. Nebraska corn improved 3% to 74% good to excellent. Kansas corn remained unchanged to 54% good to excellent. Pennsylvania continues to have one of the best corn crops at 88% good to excellent.

Soybeans have yet to complete the planting or emergence stage. That means they are still reported by NASS. Soybean planting is considered 96% complete up 3% from last week. Just 4 states have yet to hit the 90% and above planting completion. Kansas has 95% of the soybeans planted. That is 8% ahead of the 5 year average. Nebraska completed soybean planting last week.

Soybean emergence is 4% ahead of the five year average nationally at 89%. Iowa and Nebraska are both considered 96% emerged. That is 5-6% ahead of the five year average. Kansas is 15% ahead of the five year average at 86% emerged.

5% of the soybean crop nationally is considered to have entered the blooming stage. That is on pace with the five year average. Nebraska has 16% of the soybean crop blooming, up 13% from the five year average. Kansas is right at the five year average for 1%. Louisana has the most soybeans blooming at 55%.

Nationally soybeans are considered 70% good to excellent. That is down 2% from the previous week. Iowa has one of the strongest soybean crops at 84% good to excellent, up 2% from the previous week. Kansas improved 4% to 68% good to excellent. Nebraska soybeans dropped 1% to 77% good to excellent.

Winter wheat is almost completely headed at 96% nationally. That is just 1% behind the five year average. Kansas is now officially 100% headed out.  That is even with the five year average. Nebraska saw 11% of the winter wheat crop head out since last week to 96%. That is still 2% from the five year average. Montana and Michigan are the only 2 states that have not reached 90% or better headed out for winter wheat.

Winter wheat harvest continues across the country now considered 29% complete, up 14% from the previous week and 16% from a year ago. It is also 3% ahead of the five year average. Nebraska has yet to start winter wheat harvest. Kansas has harvested 25% of the winter wheat crop. That is up 16% from last week and 1% ahead of the five year average.

Nationally the winter wheat crop continues on a roller coaster of condition. Nationally the crop improved 2% to 52% good to excellent. Kansas winter wheat dropped 1% to 44% good to excellent. Nebraska increased 19%, after dropping 23% last week, to 62% good to excellent. Colorado winter wheat dropped 2% to 29% good to excellent. 37% of the crop is considered poor to very poor.

Spring wheat decreased in condition week to week at 75% good to excellent. That is down from 81% good to excellent.

Pasture and range land also benefited from the weekend rains. Nebraska pasture improved 5% to 71% good to excellent. Kansas improved 1% to 50% good to excellent. Colorado pasture is still dry with 0% in the excellent category and 26% in the good category. Colorado has the third highest very poor to poor rating at 48%. California (55% p-vp) and New Mexico (59% p-vp) are number one and two.

Topsoil moisture was able to recharge in Kansas up 14% to 61% adequate to surplus. Nebraska remained unchanged to 62% adequate to surplus. Subsoil moisture was also able to improve in Kansas up 4% to 63% adequate to surplus. Nebraska subsoil moisture improved 1% to 75% adequate to surplus.

Find the full crop progress report here: https://downloads.usda.library.cornell.edu/usda-esmis/files/8336h188j/w9505n13w/8910kf14z/prog2620.pdf  

Clay Patton has the full report information as a podcast