Tag Archives: cattle

MANHATTAN, Kan. — Registration is now open for a webinar that will help Kansas beef cattle producers prepare to manage and reduce the impacts of drought and reduced forage availability on cow herds.

The webinar will be hosted by the Kansas State University Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and K-State Research and Extension via Zoom on Thursday, July 9, at noon (CDT).

“As the saying goes, failing to plan is planning to fail,” said K-State beef specialist Sandy Johnson. “This webinar is being conducted to help cow-calf producers evaluate the options they have to make strategic adjustments in response to reduced forage availability. We want producers to be prepared to take advantage of opportunities that may arise given current resources, markets and weather.”

The program features strategic reduction of grazing pressure, drought supplementation of cows, early weaned calf nutrition and management, and calf health considerations, presented by members of the K-State beef extension team.

Register for the webinar online at https://tinyurl.com/KSUBeef-Drought-Preparedness or at www.KSUBeef.org. For questions about the event or to register, contact Lois Schreiner, lschrein@ksu.edu, or 785-532-1267.

The U.S. Cattlemen’s Association, the National Farmers Union, along with 11 other groups sent a letter to the Senate Ag Committee requesting a hearing on livestock mandatory price reporting reauthorization.

The Livestock Mandatory Reporting Rule, first established in 1999, mandates price reporting for cattle, boxed beef, swine, and lamb. It’s reauthorized every five years, with the current program expiring on September 30 of this year. The 13 groups say it represents an opportunity to make meaningful change to the program to increase transparency and true price discovery.

According to a 2019 Congressional Research Service report, a common mistake among industry stakeholders is “the low volume of negotiated purchases and a parallel trend toward increased formula purchases or other marketing arrangements.

Other concerns include confidentiality and a lack of clarity on how transactions are categorized in reports.” USCA and the other groups strongly urge the Senate Ag Committee to examine all available solutions to the current market factors depressing livestock prices and the increasing consolidation facing the U.S. cattle industry.

They say the industry is running out of time to work towards a positive reauthorization of the program. USCA says the livestock industry requires “bold leadership to realign the marketplace with its fundamentals, and that starts with modernizing the Livestock Mandatory Reporting Program.”

MANHATTAN, Kan. — A Kansas State University veterinarian is urging cattle producers to beef up their plans for managing heat stress in their herds, a challenge that costs the U.S. cattle industry up to $370 million in losses each year.

A.J. Tarpoff, a beef veterinarian with K-State Research and Extension, said cattle are resilient animals; they will often acclimate to hot temperatures.

But an accumulation of factors – including humidity, solar radiation, the color of their hide, diet and more – can drastically change a cow’s ability to withstand summer’s heat.

“It really is a multi-layer challenge,” Tarpoff said. “Each animal within a group or pen is not affected the same way. Animals with higher body condition scores, or with darker hides, or finisher steers and heifers that are getting ready to go to harvest are at higher-risk of heat stress.”

Tarpoff said heat stress decreases the reproductive efficiency and performance of cattle grazing on pasture. In confined facilities, heat stress often causes cattle to eat less, which also negatively affects their performance.

The human body cools itself on a hot day by sweating, called evaporative cooling. But Tarpoff notes that cattle sweat only 10 percent as much as humans, and panting is their primary way of dissipating heat.

“As temperatures rise and their heat load increases, they will start breathing faster,” he said. “They are dissipating heat through tiny droplets in the respiratory tract.”

Doing so, however, causes cows to eat less, setting them on a path to poor growth and future performance.

“This all has to do with heat load,” Tarpoff said. “The internal temperature of cattle will peak two hours after the hottest point of the day. So our strategy for keeping cows cool needs to be built around knowing that.”

Another factor is that cattle produce heat by digesting food, typically four to six hours after eating. “So if we feed animals within the wrong period of time, we can actually increase their heat load because the heat of digestion and the heat from the environment are building on top of each other,” Tarpoff said. “We want to keep that from happening.”

Tarpoff listed best management practices for helping to reduce heat stress in cows:

  • Handling. Receive, ship or move cattle only during the coolest parts of the day, preferably before 10 a.m.
  • Feeding. Modify feeding times. Feed 70 percent of the animals’ ration as late in the evening as possible, which puts the peak heat of digestion overnight when temperatures are likely cooler. Decrease feeding during the day.
  • Managing heat. Split cattle between pens or reduce stocking density. Maximize airflow by removing obstructions around facilities, including weeds. If feasible, install shade structures, which can reduce solar radiation and reduce the temperature on the pen’s floor. Install sprinklers to wet cattle down at night or early morning so as not to increase humidity.

Then, of course, there is the importance of providing water. Lots and lots of water.

“To put it into perspective, when the temperature goes from 70 degrees Fahrenheit to 90 degrees, a cattle will consume about double the amount of water,” Tarpoff said.

As a rule, he said cattle should consume “about five times the amount of water as the dry matter they are consuming.”

“Cool, clean and readily-available water is critical during heat stress events. We may have to increase the water tank capacity within a pen to meet these needs. Producers need to be prepared for that.”

Tarpoff said he follows two sources for help in making a decision when to put a heat stress management plan into full effect.

The U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) maintains a seven-day forecast tool for the United States, taking into account temperature, humidity and solar radiation.

“The other tool I use is the Kansas Mesonet, which provides an animal comfort index,” he said. The Kansas Mesonet, housed at Kansas State University, is a network of observation towers located across the state that updates climate information every hour.

“I know that if we don’t have those night-time cooling hours, the animal won’t be starting each day at thermo-neutral, so they’re more at risk on the second or third day,” Tarpoff said. “That’s when we should start putting in some of these management strategies.”

For more information or assistance, contact your local extension agent.

Some rain in the western corn belt.  Rains were wide spread across the corn belt. Crop progress out this afternoon.  Weekly export report showed some strong numbers for corn, but soft for beans.  Livestock, doesn’t have anything outstanding on the cattle on feed report.  How is consumer demand going, with weather & restaurants starting to reopen.  boxed beef prices averaged the lowest the market’s seen since the week of April 11.  China and trade deal work-banning poultry from Arkansas & Tyson.  Hog market sees week cash

 

Wheat harvest, July options, many balls in the air with many things being tossed at it over the weekend into the Sunday night trade.  China talk let’s get a confirmation before the markets take reaction.  Crude oil sees a bit of a rally.  Boxed beef has taken another drop…dog days of summer hitting many how does it effect consumer demand.  COVID-should we have another shelter place how is that going to effect & the back log of cattle.

Markets on Tuesday started with a risk on sentiment. By the close even the outside equities had faded on that sentiment. Grains ended mixed with spread action setting up between corn and wheat. Wheat is being sold on decent crop conditions, but also seasonal harvest market pressure. Shawn Hackett, Hackett Financial Advisors, joined the Fontanelle Final Bell and discussed the seasonality of the current marketing trends in the grains. Hackett is eyeing the Minneapolis spring wheat market as the signal for a turn around in the market. “Spring wheat is growing right now and very susceptible to a weather issue.” According to Hackett. During the Fontanelle Final Bell Hackett also highlights recent research his team has done about global crop insects and pests that could impact the markets later this year.

The second half of the Fonatenelle Final Bell is dedicated to livestock. Hackett starts with Class III milk futures and highlights that the recent upswing may be over done at $20. Hackett also doesn’t believe the live cattle lean hog spread can continue much higher.

Hear the full program here:

Markets had an almost standstill type of feel to it.  How do you market in a day like today.  There is a move to a weather-related market, as winds pick up & rain has stopped in many areas.  Crop Progress report out this afternoon, any surprises expected?  Stabilization to the ethanol market.  So, IS China back into the market for U.S. beans?  The Real has slipped a bit, is there pressure from South America for grain purchases & China?  Livestock, just like grains had an uneventful trading day.  Feeders did push to some higher money, but not by much.  Cash looks to be steady this week, we have a cattle on feed report on Friday.  How will that effect the trade?  Sue is a bit more price positive to the hog market.

 

How did the US numbers look in the WASDE report? Was there any surprises in the world numbers in the WASDE report? Will the corn demand for ethanol need to be lowered more down the road?  How does the export demand look for corn and soybeans? Do you think the crop is on pace to achieve the trend line yields for corn and soybeans?  Will there be much for adjustments in corn and soybean acres down the road? How does the corn and soybean markets look from a technical perspective? What will it take for the markets to move higher from here?  How does the weather look to you going forward? What would you do with unsold old and new crop corn and soybeans?