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USDA Rural Development Invests $4.9 Million to Modernize Water and Wastewater Infrastructure in Four Rural Nebraska Communities | KTIC Radio

USDA Rural Development Invests $4.9 Million to Modernize Water and Wastewater Infrastructure in Four Rural Nebraska Communities

USDA Rural Development Invests $4.9 Million to Modernize Water and Wastewater Infrastructure in Four Rural Nebraska Communities
Courtesy of USDA Rural Development.

LINCOLN, Neb., August 3, 2020 – USDA Rural Development Nebraska State Director Karl Elmshaeuser today announced that more than $4.9 million will be utilized for projects in the village of Clearwater, city of Lyons, village of Hyannis and the village of Page.

  “Communities need to have a sustainable water and wastewater infrastructure. USDA Rural Development provides funding to update, repair or replace water and wastewater systems as to meet regulatory guidelines as well as to make the systems reliable,” said Elmshaeuser.

  Projects funded are:

  • The village of Clearwater will utilize a $311,000 loan and $330,600 grant as additional financing for a sewer improvement project that will construct a new three-cell lagoon system with a controlled discharge via land application, a combination of replacement and relining of the collection system, and the installation of new water meters.  The existing lift station will be updated.  The new lagoon system will put the community back into compliance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) limit and the collection system improvements and water meter installation will reduce the amount of infiltration and inaccurate readings of wastewater flow so lessening the wear and tear on the system.

  • The city of Lyons will utilize a $1,000,000 loan and $586,000 grant to improve the city’s water treatment plant through new treatment vessels.  The city has an old iron and manganese removal plant that was built in 1978.  It has an aerator tower, flocculation tank, and four-cell gravity filters.   The facility is 40 years old and corrosion of the tanks (treatment vessels) for the iron and manganese are beginning to leak.
  • The village of Hyannis will use a $1,457,000 loan and $1,152,300 grant to improve their water system. Aging infrastructure will be replaced including the storage tank, distribution pipe, valves, fire hydrants, and the purchase and installation of new meters. Additionally, funds will replace deteriorating parts of the collection system. The project will ensure a safe water source and promote water conservation practices in this rural community.
  • The village of Page is using a $40,000 loan and $61,000 grant to make improvements to equipment at the water treatment plant and well by installing backup power at both.  New water meters will be installed and the replacement of 2,200-linear feet of water mains that are necessary for fire suppression.  The village is having unaccounted for water and one of its two wells is not able to meet average and maximum day demand without treatment. The village does have a treatment plant.  The village is not meeting certain applicable health or sanitary standards, specifically not having backup power.  Backup power would provide a water storage in an emergency.

Elmshaeuser’s announcement is in coordination with the Trump Administration’s  announcement that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is investing $462 million to modernize critical drinking water and wastewater infrastructure across rural America.

   USDA is providing the funding through the Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant program. Eligible applicants include rural cities, towns and water districts. The funds can be used for drinking water, stormwater drainage and waste disposal systems in rural communities with 10,000 or fewer residents.

 “Upgrading the infrastructure that delivers safe drinking water and modern wastewater management facilities will improve public health and drive economic development in our small towns and cities,” Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development Bette Brand said. “Under the leadership of President Trump and Agriculture Secretary Perdue, USDA continues to be a strong partner with rural communities, because we know that when rural America thrives, all of America thrives.”

  If your community is interested in a water or wastewater project, view the interactive RD Apply tool or contact a Nebraska Community Programs Specialist.

  USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov.

If you’d like to subscribe to USDA Rural Development updates, visit our GovDelivery subscriber page.

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