Tag Archives: Wheat Harvest

Corn silking was estimated at 58% and soybeans blooming were pegged at 57% as of Sunday, July 28. Corn was rated 58% in good-to-excellent condition, up 1 percentage point from the previous week, and soybean condition was rated 54%, unchanged from the previous week, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report.

Check this page throughout the afternoon for additional highlights from this week’s report.

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov/…. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

Clay Patton has the report details here: https://post.futurimedia.com/krvnam/playlist/futures-one-crop-progress-report-no-huge-changes-week-to-week-7262.html

National Crop Progress Summary
This Last Last 5-Year
Week Week Year Avg.
Corn Silking 58 35 90 83
Corn Dough 13 5 35 23
Soybeans Blooming 57 40 85 79
Soybeans Setting Pods 21 7 58 45
Winter Wheat Harvested 75 69 84 86
Spring Wheat Headed 97 92 99 98
Cotton Squaring 86 78 87 87
Cotton Setting Bolls 45 33 48 48
Sorghum Headed 33 27 52 50
Sorghum Coloring 21 16 25 25
Barley Headed 96 90 97 98
Oats Headed 97 94 100 100
Oats Harvested 21 12 36 35
Rice Headed 42 31 61 57

**

National Crop Condition Summary
(VP = Very Poor; P = Poor; F = Fair; G = Good; E = Excellent)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VP P F G E VP P F G E VP P F G E
Corn 3 9 30 47 11 3 10 30 47 10 3 6 19 50 22
Soybeans 3 10 33 45 9 3 9 34 46 8 2 6 22 53 17
Spring Wheat 1 5 21 62 11 4 20 63 13 1 3 18 64 14
Cotton 1 10 28 46 15 2 8 30 50 10 11 19 27 34 9
Sorghum 1 3 25 59 12 1 2 23 60 13 4 11 33 44 8
Barley 5 18 62 15 5 19 58 18 1 2 17 66 14
Oats 2 6 26 53 13 3 5 28 52 12 4 3 22 58 13
Rice 1 6 25 48 20 1 6 28 46 19 1 7 23 55 14

**

National Soil Moisture Condition – 48 States
(VS = Very Short; SH = Short; AD = Adequate; SR = Surplus)
This Week Last Week Last Year
VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR VS SH AD SR
Topsoil Moisture 7 24 61 8 5 19 64 12 12 27 56 5
Subsoil Moisture 4 19 69 8 3 15 70 12 12 27 57 4

Corn silking was pegged at 35% as of Sunday, July 21, still far behind the five-year average of 66%. Corn was rated 57% in good-to-excellent condition, down one percentage point from last week and way down from the 72% rating seen last year at this time, according to this week’s USDA NASS Crop Progress report. This could be good for the grain bulls as many analysts were expected a 58% good to excellent rating. In a Statewide look Nebraska’s crop was rated at 77% good to excellent, Kansas was rated at 57% good to excellent. The best corn in the nation looks to be in Tennessee with a rating of 85% good to excellent.

Soybeans nationally have reached 40% blooming. A far cry from a year ago’s 76% blooming and about 26% behind the five year average. Soybeans setting pods is also behind nationally at 7%. Nebraska soybeans have set 8% pods, 17% less than a year ago. Kansas soybeans have set 6% pods, 9% behind a year ago. Analysts expected soybeans to be unchanged week to week at 54% good to excellent. The USDA confirmed these numbers. Nebraska’s crop is rated at 73% good to excellent. Kansas is rated at 50% good to excellent.

Winter wheat harvest rolled across Kansas with last week’s heat. Nationally the harvest is still 10% behind at 69% complete. Rains may have delayed a few harvesters in Nebraska as harvest nears 33% complete, as compared to 76% a on the five year average.

Topsoil moisture remained fairly similar with Kansas rated 73% adequate to surplus and Nebraska at 87% adequate to surplus.

Clay Patton breaks down the report here: http://bit.ly/32GiyLb

To view weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states, visit http://www.nass.usda.gov. Look for the U.S. map in the “Find Data and Reports by” section and choose the state you wish to view in the drop-down menu. Then look for that state’s “Crop Progress & Condition” report.

This is day 15 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Fields of wheat that are not yet harvested are fewer and farther between as harvest is wrapping up. Most farmers will be done by this weekend or the beginning of next week.

Roger Snodgrass, of McDougal-Sager & Snodgrass Grain Inc., in Rawlins County, reports that they are about 80% done with this year’s wheat harvest. Snodgrass says they missed out on most of the big rains this year and did not get too much hail. While they are seeing lower protein levels, they are also seeing above average yields and good test weights.

“Most of the guys are smiling around here and are happy with the crop that we are seeing,” says Snodgrass.

Theron Haresnape, a farmer near Lebanon in Smith County, says that wheat harvest is finally winding down. He said they didn’t receive any hail in their area, just rain showers.

Haresnape said, “It has been a pretty good year. The biggest rain we had all spring was 2.5 inches.”

With above average yields and protein levels in the area between 11.5 and 12%, Haresnape is pleased with this year’s wheat harvest. Haresnape says if the weather cooperates, they plan to increase acreage in the fall; however, he will still be planting 25-30% less than ‘normal.’

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 14 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

About two weeks behind schedule, wheat harvest in Kansas is progressing quickly with high temperatures this week about 100°F in northwest Kansas.

According to Larry Glenn, of Frontier AG Inc. in Quinter in Gove County, harvest is 85-90% complete in the area. Glenn reported that yields are above average in the western third of the state. Harvest was delayed and started out slow, but then moved very quickly.

Glenn said they started paying protein premiums last year and added protein testers in all locations. Protein is averaging about 10.5%.

Storage is an issue in the area, with the bunker in Quinter full. They are getting some rail cars in to start moving grain as the elevator space gets tight.

“We’ve been blessed with rains in this area,” Glenn said, adding that the rains didn’t come too much at a time like other areas. While there was some hail, it was spotty and didn’t cause widespread damage.

“We are well above last year on bushels, which was a good year,” Glenn said.

Larry Snow of Heartland Mills in Marienthal in Wichita County, reports that yields are way above average, but proteins are way below, estimating high 10s for most of the organic wheat they buy. Fortunately for the mill, they have been able to source higher protein wheat from other areas in the high plains.

“There will be a lot of 8s and 9s that would take too much to blend up, so it will end up as organic feed wheat,” said Snow. He said that harvest has been about two weeks late and is nearing completion. He added, “Test weights are really good.”

Ken Wood, who farms near Chapman in Dickinson County, wrapped up wheat harvest this last Saturday. Wood said they had good yields that were on higher ground in the fields and some lower yields where water stood for a longer period of time. Wood says they don’t test proteins, but they had solid test weight numbers for the year.

“I was pleased with the outcome that we had this year. It turned out better than we expected,” Wood said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 11 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

The hot, dry weekend weather was just what farmers needed to make some excellent progress on wheat harvest in Kansas.

Mike McClellan, who farms in Rooks County, is wrapping up his wheat harvest on Monday. Their harvest started on July 1, and they have seen good yields and test weights, but lower than average protein levels.

“We’ve had a really good harvest run this year,” said McClellan. “We’re pretty happy with the yields. No complaints here.” He added, “We’re ready to wrap it up.”

McClellan reports that the area is about 80-90% finished with wheat harvest.

“We’ve been pleasantly surprised on some fields, and disappointed on others,” he said. Yields have ranged from 20 on a field with hail damage to 80s on his best wheat. Test weights have remained over 60 pounds per bushel, and his proteins have been lower than average, which he partially attributes to the fact that they were late getting nitrogen on because of the moisture. He said he has neighbors who have gotten as high as 12s on protein.

Wheat harvest for Lisa Schemm, who farms in Wallace and Logan counties, got into full swing on July 10. They had started cutting on July 4, but rains kept them out of the fields until last week. A normal start date for them is June 25. A severe storm on June 22 hit some of their wheat and corn hard with hail.

Schemm reports that they are now a little over half done with harvest. She says that yields are above average, and test weights have remained well above 60, ranging from 62-63. Areas that had to be replanted aren’t yielding as well, so planting date has definitely had an effect on yields. Their protein levels have been coming in about 10.5%.

Schemm says the Kansas Wheat Alliance variety Kanmark has been performing well for them this year. She says morale is a little higher in their area, with the excellent yields and a slightly higher wheat price. Overall, wheat harvest is going well; it’s just behind schedule. She hopes to wrap up by the end of the week.

Brian Linin, a farmer from Goodland in Sherman County, started his harvest on July 8, and they’ve been rolling ever since. His wheat is yielding quite a bit above average, ranging from 70 bushels per acre and up. Test weights are 61.5 to 62 pounds per bushel, and proteins are ranging from 11.5 to 13%.

Linin says this is an above average year, with good quality wheat and good kernel size. He reports that he has about 1,200 acres left to cut, so their harvest will last about another week. The WestBred variety WB-Grainfield and a WB-Grainfield/PlainsGold Langin blend are performing well for him.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 10 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

With dry weather in northwest Kansas this week, many farmers in the area are finally getting to start harvesting their first fields of the 2019 crop. Yields are above average and while most of the state is seeing below average protein, there are pockets of protein in several areas.

According to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Kansas winter wheat production is forecast at 330 million bushels, up 19 percent from last year. Average yield is forecast at 50 bushels per acre, up 12 bushels from 2018. Area to be harvested for grain is estimated at 6.60 million acres, down 10 percent from a year ago.

Casey Andersen, a 4th generation farmer in Gove County south of Oakley, reports that his family got started with harvest on July 8, the latest start that he or his dad can remember.

Yields are above average due to rain and the cool, wet fill period. He said, “It has been an excellent year for wheat.”

He has about two weeks of harvest left, and Oakley CL is a variety that has been performing well on his farm. The main issue they have had this year is some lodging due to the excessive moisture.

Andersen reports test weights of 63-64 pounds on Oakley CL, and proteins ranging from 10.5 to 11.5%.

Jennifer Princ of Midway Coop Association in Luray reports that they took their first load of wheat in on June 26, their latest start since 1996. They are 90-95% complete with harvest in their area.

She said yields in their area have ranged from 18 to 104, with a strong correlation between planting date and yield. The overall average yield for their farmers is 50-60 bushels per acre. Princ said test weights have averaged 61.2 pounds per bushel, and protein average is 12.04%.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 8 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Scattered storms continue to be a theme for #WheatHarvest19 with farmers in the state playing “hurry up and wait.” According to USDA NASS winter wheat condition in the state is rated 4 percent very poor, 11 poor, 27 fair, 42 good and 16 excellent. Winter wheat mature was 92 percent. Harvested was 61 percent, well behind 89 last year and 84 for the five-year average.

David Janzen, a farmer from Butler County, is trying to wrap up his harvest this year, with about 80 acres left to cut. He is hoping the rain stays away long enough for him to get done. Janzen is seeing yields that vary from field to field, but he is fairly pleased with the yields he is seeing, considering the amount of rain he has received this year.

“We are just thankful that we still have a crop to cut,” Janzen said.

Ron Suppes, a farmer in Lane County, has come to a standstill with his wheat harvest as it began to rain again today. His area has had quite a few rain showers with high humidity, which is making it difficult for local farmers to get into the fields. With the wheat that they have harvested, Suppes reports consistent protein levels at 10-11.5% and above average yields.

Romulo Lollato, Wheat and Forages Extension Specialist with K-State Research and Extension, reported yields in south central and central Kansas have been highly variable (due to planting dates and moisture surpluses that drowned out quite a few acres), while out west, farmers are consistently seeing above average yields. Some areas in western Kansas are still seeing some green wheat because it was late getting planted. Test weights throughout the state continue to hold steady at 60 pounds per bushel and above.

“Since September 1, the central part of the state has received over 60 inches of rain, and the rain got in the way of grain production early on,” Lollato said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 6 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. Harvest Reports will resume on July 7th, weather permitting.

Wheat harvest continues to slowly work northward in Kansas as farmers are racing against Mother Nature while needing to crawl slowly through the remaining fields due to green stems (but ripe heads.) Isolated storms did flare up on Wednesday, but limited rainfall didn’t delay harvest substantially. There are more scattered storms in the forecast again over the weekend and harvest might slow down if the weather pattern shifts back to rains.

Bob Temple, of WindRiver Grain in Garden City, reported that his area is usually wrapping up harvest around this time, but they are running a little behind schedule due to the rain they received this year. On the bright side – they are seeing above average yields and hope to finish harvest closer to the end of next week. Their protein levels have been below average.

Morgan Walls, of Elkhart Coop, is running about two weeks behind in wheat harvest this year. Their protein levels are averaging about 10.5-11 percent and test weights are ranging from 60-64 pounds per bushel. They are seeing above average yields, having 40-60 bushels per acre instead of 20-25 per acre. He is hoping to finish harvest out within the next two weeks.

Justin Ochs, Skyland Grain in Johnson, also reported a two week delay behind a normal harvesting schedule. Ochs said that they may be looking at a 70 bushels per acre average for harvest, but he also pointed out that many farmers in their territory had been ‘hammered by hail’, so that number could have been higher. Test weights are in the mid-60s, but proteins are lower than average (with the exception of a pocket from Eastern Colorado that is right at 12 percent.) He estimates that the area will be cutting for another ten days, depending on if the weather cooperates.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.