Tag Archives: Nebraska Farm Bureau

A new report says a nearly $200 million decline in Nebraska’s agricultural exports in 2017 was driven by President Donald Trump’s threats to impose tariffs on U.S. trading partners.

The Nebraska Farm Bureau report attributes the drop to decreases in soybean and corn exports, while beef and pork exports both increased in 2017.

The bureau’s senior economist, Jay Rempe, says Trump’s talks of tariffs in January 2017 caused a decline in soybean and other commodity prices. Rempe points out that China’s retaliatory tariffs didn’t occur until May 2018.

The findings come as Trump imposed his latest tariff hike on Chinese goods Friday. Beijing vowed retaliatory measures.

Rempe says Nebraska’s agricultural community will continue to face pressure unless the administration resolves its trade disputes with China, Mexico and other countries.

LINCOLN, NEB. – “We looked around and didn’t know where to start. The devastation was so overwhelming, but the check we received from the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund helped us take the first step and know that we are not alone. We are so grateful,” said Tom and Fran Geisler, who farm and raise cattle near Hooper.

“The kindness and generosity of people across Nebraska and the United States is humbling,” said Steve Nelson, Nebraska Farm Bureau president. “More than $2 million has been collected for the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund, with 100 percent of funds raised going to farmers, ranchers, and rural communities in need of assistance,” said Nelson.

According to the Nebraska Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), 104 cities, 81 counties, and five tribal areas have had emergency declarations. The cost of the damage by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture is estimated at $440 million in crop losses; and $400 million in cattle losses. Other estimates include $449 million in damages to roads, levees, and other infrastructure across the state.

“For us to continue to rebuild our farms, ranches, and rural communities, it will take patience and perseverance to get through the magnitude of the loss and destruction,” said Nelson. “While the response to this fund has been overwhelming, we have seen requests for aid come into the Disaster Relief Fund totaling more than what we currently have in the fund. The amount we have raised doesn’t meet the assistance already requested, and additional applications are received each day.”

The fund was established at the Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charitable nonprofit, so donations meet the criteria for qualified charitable contributions for tax purposes.

“When we first started the fund, the immediate need in rural areas was water, food, shelter, and medicine for people and animals,” said Megahn Schafer, executive director of the Nebraska Farm Bureau Foundation.

“As health and safety situations stabilize, other needs have emerged, including clearing flood debris from pastures, fields, and homes; rebuilding fences to protect livestock; paying for extra fuel to deliver hay to stranded cattle; and helping restore fresh water to residents and animals in places like Boyd County,” said Schafer.

At Chance Ridge near Elkhorn, funds from the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund have been used to buy fuel, food, and lodging for those volunteering to help with clean up. “We serve as a delivery hub for hay and other supplies,” said Autumn Rock of Chance Ridge Event Center. “Because of the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund, we were able to help more than 150 farmers from across the state and keep more than 10-thousand head of cattle alive. This fund is truly making a difference.”

The need for assistance, both short term and long term, continues to grow. Each day there are different requests, and the Nebraska Farm Bureau Disaster Relief Fund stands ready to help farmers, ranchers, and rural communities.

“The repairs and recovery from this disaster will take a huge amount of resources. The next step is to provide support for intermediate and long-term recovery efforts in areas where there are gaps in availability of insurance coverage and government assistance,” said Nelson.

“We continue to seek financial donations to meet the growing aid requests coming into the Disaster Relief Fund,” said Schafer. “Every dollar counts. When we all give, we come together as one community, making Nebraska stronger.”

To donate, apply for aid, or access other disaster assistance resources, visit www.nefb.org/disaster.

LINCOLN, NEB. – Elected leaders of Nebraska’s agricultural organizations thanked members of the Legislature’s Revenue, Education, and Retirement Committees for their efforts to find a solution to high property taxes in Nebraska, but urged lawmakers to avoid repurposing dollars from the state’s Property Tax Credit Fund as a means to fund the Revenue Committee’s new property tax relief proposal. The request was made in testimony during an April 24 hearing on an amendment to the Revenue Committee’s LB 289.

 

Ken Herz, a rancher from Lawrence, provided testimony on behalf of the Agriculture Leaders Working Group representing the member-elected leaders from the Nebraska Cattlemen, Nebraska Corn Growers Association, Nebraska Farm Bureau, Nebraska Pork Producers Association, Nebraska Soybean Association, Nebraska State Dairy Association, and Nebraska Wheat Growers Association.

 

The Property Tax Credit Fund is a state fund that provides $224 million in property tax relief to Nebraska taxpayers on an annual basis. The amendment to LB 289 would take the $224 million from the Property Tax Credit Fund and use it to help pay for a new Revenue Committee proposal estimated to provide an additional $412 million in property tax relief above and beyond the $224 million delivered through the Property Tax Credit Fund.  The Revenue Committee’s amendment to LB 289 would lower valuations for commercial, residential, and agricultural lands, provide foundation aid to schools, provide for a minimum state aid guarantee based on a school’s needs in the state aid formula, and lower the local effort rate for schools, among other provisions.

 

In urging the committees to leave the Property Tax Credit Fund intact, the Agriculture Leaders asked the committees to look at alternative ways to fund the Revenue Committee’s new property tax relief proposal, noting the amendment already included provisions to increase the state’s sales tax rate and to broaden the state’s sales tax base by eliminating sales tax exemptions.

 

The Agriculture Leaders continues to offer support for both increasing the state sales tax rate and broadening the sales tax base as a way to offset property tax reductions and provide a means for the state to take on greater financial responsibility for providing state funding to all of Nebraska’s K-12 schools.