Tag Archives: Kansas

Governor Laura Kelly appointed Earl Lewis as Director of the Kansas Water Office.

“Earl has proven to be a skilled and knowledgeable leader when it comes to water conservation and other important issues related to this precious resource,” Kelly said.

Lewis joined the Kansas Water Office in 1999 working first with reservoir operations and analysis before serving as the agency’s chief technical staff and overseeing agency operations. Before joining the Kansas Water Office, he worked for seven years in the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources working on water use, water right compliance, water conservation, and interstate litigation.

“I’m honored the Governor has selected me for this position and am excited to join the Kelly administration,” Lewis said. “I look forward to working with the Governor and stakeholders across Kansas to improve our water resources.”

Lewis is a lifelong Kansan and was raised on a farm in Osage County. His family raised row crops, cattle, and ran a custom hay business. He attended both Emporia State University and the University of Kansas, graduating with a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Kansas in 1992.  He also holds a professional engineering license in Kansas.

Lewis’ appointment is pending confirmation by the Senate.

This is day 15 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Fields of wheat that are not yet harvested are fewer and farther between as harvest is wrapping up. Most farmers will be done by this weekend or the beginning of next week.

Roger Snodgrass, of McDougal-Sager & Snodgrass Grain Inc., in Rawlins County, reports that they are about 80% done with this year’s wheat harvest. Snodgrass says they missed out on most of the big rains this year and did not get too much hail. While they are seeing lower protein levels, they are also seeing above average yields and good test weights.

“Most of the guys are smiling around here and are happy with the crop that we are seeing,” says Snodgrass.

Theron Haresnape, a farmer near Lebanon in Smith County, says that wheat harvest is finally winding down. He said they didn’t receive any hail in their area, just rain showers.

Haresnape said, “It has been a pretty good year. The biggest rain we had all spring was 2.5 inches.”

With above average yields and protein levels in the area between 11.5 and 12%, Haresnape is pleased with this year’s wheat harvest. Haresnape says if the weather cooperates, they plan to increase acreage in the fall; however, he will still be planting 25-30% less than ‘normal.’

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 14 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

About two weeks behind schedule, wheat harvest in Kansas is progressing quickly with high temperatures this week about 100°F in northwest Kansas.

According to Larry Glenn, of Frontier AG Inc. in Quinter in Gove County, harvest is 85-90% complete in the area. Glenn reported that yields are above average in the western third of the state. Harvest was delayed and started out slow, but then moved very quickly.

Glenn said they started paying protein premiums last year and added protein testers in all locations. Protein is averaging about 10.5%.

Storage is an issue in the area, with the bunker in Quinter full. They are getting some rail cars in to start moving grain as the elevator space gets tight.

“We’ve been blessed with rains in this area,” Glenn said, adding that the rains didn’t come too much at a time like other areas. While there was some hail, it was spotty and didn’t cause widespread damage.

“We are well above last year on bushels, which was a good year,” Glenn said.

Larry Snow of Heartland Mills in Marienthal in Wichita County, reports that yields are way above average, but proteins are way below, estimating high 10s for most of the organic wheat they buy. Fortunately for the mill, they have been able to source higher protein wheat from other areas in the high plains.

“There will be a lot of 8s and 9s that would take too much to blend up, so it will end up as organic feed wheat,” said Snow. He said that harvest has been about two weeks late and is nearing completion. He added, “Test weights are really good.”

Ken Wood, who farms near Chapman in Dickinson County, wrapped up wheat harvest this last Saturday. Wood said they had good yields that were on higher ground in the fields and some lower yields where water stood for a longer period of time. Wood says they don’t test proteins, but they had solid test weight numbers for the year.

“I was pleased with the outcome that we had this year. It turned out better than we expected,” Wood said.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

TOPEKA, Kan. — The Kansas Soybean Commission (KSC) will conduct its Annual Meeting Monday, Aug. 26, at the Kansas Soybean Building in Topeka. It is scheduled to begin at 8 a.m.

During that meeting, the commissioners will elect officers for the coming year and approve their request for proposals (RFP) for fiscal year 2021 research and education projects.

Other discussion topics will be current and future research projects, market-development activities, educational programs, and administrative items. To obtain a complete agenda or to suggest additional matters for deliberation, contact KSC Administrator Kenlon Johannes at johannes@kansassoybeans.org or call the Kansas Soybean office at 877-KS-SOYBEAN (877-577-6923).

This is day 13 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Harvest continues to roll through northern Kansas as farmers try to pick up the pace to make up for some lost time. Yields continue to be highly variable throughout the state, with some areas seeing double the county averages, while others are making 25-30 bushels per acre. Pockets of protein continue to be reported in localized areas of the state.

Lynn Moore, a farmer near Pittsburg, finished wheat harvest about two weeks ago. Moore says they had solid yields throughout harvest, and test weights ranged in the upper 50’s.

“It was unexpected for wheat harvest to go as well as it did, but we are just glad it is done and out of the field,” Moore said.

Dell Princ, of Midway Coop Association in Osborne County, reported that they are in the final stages of their wheat harvest this year.

“These are some of the best yields we have seen, considering the year we have had,” Princ said. With solid test weights and proteins ranging from 11-11.5%, Princ is pleased with this year’s harvest.

Chris Tanner, a farmer near Norton, reported that he began his harvest on July 4th (when they normally finish up) but had to press pause for rains until July 12. He is currently about halfway done. He estimates that this year’s county average is in the mid-50s, with some acres seeing upwards of 90 bushels an acre, but others averaging only 25 bushels per acre. Tanner says that fertilized fields are yielding much better, and that proteins in the area are ranging from 10.5-11%. Test weights are 61-63 pounds per bushel. The Syngenta/AgriPro variety Bob Dole is performing very well for Tanner.

“Weather made it difficult to get wheat drilled, and a lot of guys got it in late,” said Tanner. “Spring moisture made it hard to get fertilizer on. Everything has been a fight for us — calving, spraying, planting and overly saturated soils.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

With Texas, Colorado and New Mexico reporting multiple confirmed cases of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), the Kansas Department of Agriculture is encouraging livestock owners to be aware and take precautions, particularly with animals that may be comingling with other animals at competitions and similar events. At this time, there have been no cases of VSV reported in Kansas.

VSV is a viral disease which primarily affects horses, but can also affect cattle, sheep, goats, swine, llamas and alpacas. The disease is characterized by fever and the formation of blister-like lesions in the mouth and on the dental pad, tongue, lips, nostrils, ears, hooves and teats. Infected animals may refuse to eat and drink, which can lead to weight loss. There are no USDA-approved vaccines for VSV.

The primary way the virus is transmitted is from biting insects like black flies, sand flies and midges. Owners should consider treatments to reduce insects where animals are housed. VSV can also be spread by nose-to-nose contact between animals. The virus itself usually runs its course in five to seven days, and it can take up to an additional seven days for the infected animal to recover from the symptoms. Premises with animals diagnosed with VSV are quarantined until at least 14 days after the last affected animal is diagnosed.

VSV is considered a reportable disease in Kansas. Any person who suspects their animals may have VSV should contact their local veterinarian or state animal health official.

KDA has implemented increased importation requirements from the affected regions to help prevent the spread of VSV into Kansas. Likewise, many states have now enhanced their importation requirements as well. Therefore, animal health officials strongly encourage all livestock owners and veterinarians to call the animal health authority in the destination state for the most current import requirements prior to travel.

The latest VSV situation reports are available at this USDA website:https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/animal-disease-information/cattle-disease-information/vesicular-stomatitis-info.

This is day 9 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Jerald Kemmerer, of Pride Ag Resources in Ford County, says that they are about 80-85% done with wheat harvest this year. With good looking tests weights and sporadic yields, they are still pleased with the wheat that they are cutting. “If mother nature would work with us, we could wrap up harvest this weekend,” says Kemmerer.

John Lightcap, of Offerle Coop Grain & Supply Co in Edwards County, said their wheat harvest is coming to an end for the year as long as the rain stays away. Lightcap says that he is pleased with the protein and test weight numbers that he is seeing in their crop. Harvesting at 3 different locations, they are seeing better protein numbers in northern fields. Being about 93% done with harvest, Lightcap believes that if the weather holds out they should be able to wrap up wheat harvest within the next four to five days.

Frontier Ag Inc. in Graham County is just getting the ball rolling with wheat harvest. Although the area is typically done by now, local farmers are just getting a good start this week. With the wheat that they have cut, they are seeing good test weights and average protein levels. They are hoping to continue on with wheat harvest and its above average yields as the week progresses.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

MANHATTAN, Kan. — A Kansas State University row crop specialist says he’s happy – even if surprised – by the low incidence of disease he’s finding in the state’s corn fields so far this summer.

But he’s urging growers to continue scouting their fields for diseases that have been commonly found in Kansas in past years.

“I have been surprised by the low levels of gray leaf spot in most fields,” said Doug Jardine, who has traveled several areas of Kansas over the past few weeks looking at corn and soybean fields.

“In those areas where I was able to find gray leaf spot, it was on the very lowest leaves, even in some fields that I know have had a problem with a history of this disease.”

Gray leaf spot is a fungus that causes an estimated loss of 9 million bushels of corn per year in Kansas. It was first found in the state in 1989, and is considered the most serious foliar disease of corn in Kansas and the north central United States.

For that reason, indications that it might not be as prevalent so far this summer is no reason for growers to become complacent.

“It’s present in the state, so we need to be scouting,” Jardine said. “But at this point, I was not personally in any fields that I think are going to need a fungicide this year. And given the commodity prices this year, if we can save $15 to $25, that’s probably a good thing.”

He added that the lower incidence of the disease in Kansas could be due to growers’ tendency in recent years to plant hybrids containing tolerance to gray leaf spot, “because that’s what we’ve preached as the primary management practice for years.”

Jardine said that gray leaf spot is sometimes confused with another disease that shows up routinely in Kansas – bacterial leaf streak, a bacteria that is more common in corn fields managed under continuous no-till and center pivot irrigation.

He noted that bacterial leaf streak is mostly found in the western one-third of Kansas, but has been found recently in the southeast (Labette County), north central (Clay County) and south central (Butler County) parts of the state.

“To an untrained eye, this disease can look very similar to gray leaf spot,” Jardine said. “We know over the last 3-4 years that people thought they had gray leaf spot, went out and sprayed and saw no response to the fungicide application – that’s because fungicides don’t work on bacteria.”

Differences between the two diseases are often seen in the lesions that appear on the leaves of the corn plant.

“With gray leaf spot, the lesions are defined by the vein, so they have very sharp borders on them; they don’t cross the vein,” Jardine said. “With bacterial leaf streak, they don’t respect that vein, so they can have a wavy edge that crosses the border and comes back. They tend to be very long and linear.”

He noted that another test is to hold up an infected leaf so that it is back-lit by the sun. If the light passes through readily (translucent), the disease is likely to be bacterial leaf streak. But if light doesn’t pass through the lesions (opaque) and appears dark brown, the disease is likely to be gray leaf spot.

In either case, Jardine suggests that growers submit samples of suspect leaves through their local extension office, or send directly to the plant disease diagnostic lab at Kansas State University.

In addition, Jardine said corn growers should be on the lookout for signs of the root lesion nematode, which were “very severe” in northeast Kansas (Doniphan and Brown counties) a year ago.

Producers who suspect an infestation of root lesion nematodes should dig up whole plants 30-40 days past emergence, shake off the excess soil from roots, and send the sample into the plant disease diagnostic lab.

Jardine said one sample received at K-State a year ago had a count of 100,000 nematodes per gram of root weight. That’s a huge number considering that yield losses in corn are common with infestations of 5,000 to 10,000 nematodes per gram of root weight.

“You’re looking for stunted areas in the fields, especially if they’re starting to become a little chlorotic (yellowish),” Jardine said.

Specific to soybeans, Jardine said he’s keeping his eye out for the presence of frogeye leaf spot, which could take hold in some fields this year because of the wet June weather in Kansas.

More information on crop diseases in Kansas is available from K-State’s Department of Plant Pathology, and the weekly e-Update published by the Department of Agronomy.

The Kansas Department of Agriculture recently hosted two State Trade Expansion Program (STEP) Grant trade missions to Foro Mascotas Pet Food International in Guadalajara, Mexico, and AGRO 2019 in Kyiv, Ukraine. The trade missions provided Kansas companies an opportunity to showcase and offer their products to an international audience. Companies participating in the trade mission to Mexico included: Engineered Systems and Equipment (E.S.E), Caney, and NorthWind Technical Services, Sabetha. Companies participating in the trade mission to Ukraine included: Moridge Manufacturing Inc. (Grasshopper Company), Moundridge, ShieldAg Equipment, Hutchinson, and USC, Sabetha.

“The STEP Grant was designed to help small businesses expand their exports. We’ve been fortunate in Kansas to have received the STEP grant to help Kansas farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses to explore new markets or increase the value of export sales in existing markets,” said Suzanne Ryan-Numrich, international trade director at KDA.

Exports are important to the Kansas economy. In 2018, over $3.8 billion of agricultural goods were shipped around the globe to 74 different countries.

The trade missions were sponsored by KDA and funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration using a STEP grant in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Commerce.

Ray Garvey, export manager at the Grasshopper Company, was among those who traveled to AGRO 2019. “From my point of view, there are several aspects of the AGRO show that were a success,” he said. “I want to thank the state of Kansas and the SBA for this opportunity to discover a new market in Ukraine. I’m looking forward to further exploring this market for my company.”

The Kansas Department of Agriculture is dedicated to providing an environment that enhances and encourages economic growth of the agriculture industry and the Kansas economy including the further development and expansion of marketing opportunities for agricultural goods and services around the globe.

The KDA is offering an upcoming opportunity for Kansas farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses to participate in a livestock genetic trade mission to Uruguay this fall, from September 10-16. Additionally, two STEP Grant trade missions are planned for 2020: VICTAM Asia/Petfood Forum Asia, Bangkok, Thailand, March 24-26; and NAMPO Harvest Day, Bothaville, South Africa, May 12-15. Interested persons should contact Ryan-Numrich at suzanne.numrich@ks.gov or 785-564-6704.

Today’s announcement of EPA’s final 2020 Renewable Volume Obligation (RVO) rule under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a positive step only if EPA chooses not to grant additional RFS exemptions to refiners according to Kansas Corn leaders. The RFS provides market access for renewable fuels like ethanol.

 

The RVO sets the volume of renewable fuels required by the RFS for the coming year. While the ethanol levels are in accordance with the Renewable Fuel Standard, KCGA remains concerned about potential refinery exemptions.

 

“EPA did what it was supposed to do with the RVO and we appreciate that,” Kansas Corn CEO Greg Krissek said. “However, the ethanol industry continues suffer from uncertainty because of the pending requests from oil refiners to be exempted from the RFS. One bright spot is USDA and Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue’s continued support for biofuels and reaching out to EPA on the waiver review process.”

 

Kansas Corn Commission Chairman Dennis McNinch, who farms in west central Kansas, said the commission is continuing its work to build infrastructure to make blends like E15 available to consumers in more locations across the state and the nation.

 

“We are working to build demand and build an infrastructure to offer higher blends of ethanol, like E15, which benefits consumers, retailers and the environment. But we have serious concerns about the market impacts of pending waiver requests from oil refiners who don’t want to comply with the RFS,” McNinch said.

 

While EPA has completed a rule that allows year-round sales of E15 fuel, and in the RVO rule, has followed the RFS law in setting renewable fuel levels, uncertainty remains for corn and ethanol producers.

 

“As usual, we are waiting for the other shoe to drop,” McNinch said. “We have been urging the Trump administration, and EPA to deny another round refinery waivers. EPA has granted an unprecedented amount of refinery waivers in the last few years that have sent shock waves through the ethanol industry. Honestly, we cannot handle any more government-generated demand loss for our product.”

 

As EPA implements this volume rule, and considers pending petitions for RFS exemptions, Kansas Corn urges the agency to prevent further demand destruction and support a strong RFS that will benefit America’s farmers and rural communities, provide cleaner air and boost our nation’s energy security.

 

The Kansas Corn Growers Association represents its grower members in legislative and regulatory issues and promotes corn and corn products. The Kansas Corn Commission invests grower checkoff dollars in the areas of market development, education, research and promotion.