Tag Archives: Harvest

This is day 16, the final day of the 2019 Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Wheat harvest has essentially wrapped up in Kansas with last week’s hot dry weather.

According to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, Kansas winter wheat harvest is 96 percent complete, near 100 last year and 98 for the five-year average.

Erik Lange, Senior Vice President and chief operating officer, MKC, says their more than 40 locations across Kansas have taken in about two-thirds of their 5-year average on bushels, due to reduced acres because of the wet conditions last fall. MKC is located in 24 counties across Kansas, from Seward County in the southwest to Sumner County in south central to Pottawatomie County in the north east.

Lange reported that overall, harvest was about 2 to 2 ½ weeks later than normal statewide but a little less delayed in the west. He said yields varied widely across the state.

In south central counties, yields were below average, and in central counties, yields were quite a bit lower than normal, due to rain. Further to the north and east, there were good yields in areas, but not in the low lying areas. He said that in southwest Kansas, this year’s harvest was some of the best wheat in years.

Test weights in the trade territory ranged from average to above average in most locations. There were a few places in central and south central Kansas that got some rains on mature wheat where test weights were slightly below average.

Proteins also varied by location. In the west, Lange reported that proteins were well below average, ranging from 10 ½ to 11 ½ percent, with spotted areas of 12s. In central and south central Kansas, proteins ranged from 10 ½ to 12 percent, which is above a normal average of 10 ½ to 11 percent.

Lange reported that most of harvest is wrapped up, but they are still waiting on mudholes. He said, “Spring was a battle. We appreciate the rain, but timing could have been better.”

He said acres that were planted late were not as good as the early planted. He predicts that acres may go up slightly in MKC’s trade territory this fall, but he is skeptical on how many acres that is, saying “If corn and beans come off in a timely manner, there may be some more wheat planted this fall. Weather played such a factor in acreage this year.”

Eric Sperber, GM/CEO at Cornerstone Ag, in Colby, said this was “one of the quickest harvests we’ve had in a long time,” reporting that they took in 95% of their receipts between July 10-19.

Sperber said this year’s harvest was about 1 ½ to 2 weeks late. They took their first load of wheat on July 3; their previous latest start date was July 1.

He said that yields were excellent in northwest Kansas, with customers calling it their “best crop ever” and a “once in a lifetime crop.” Test weights were also very good, averaging 61.5 to 62 pounds per bushel. He reports that the proteins were the lowest average he has seen in his 15 years with Cornerstone, averaging 10.7 percent.

Sperber said they took in more hard white wheat this year than in the previous three years combined. He said the majority of the hard white wheat was the Kansas Wheat Alliance variety Joe, and that farmers were pleased with Joe. Some farmers reported that they planted Joe last fall because of concerns about wheat streak mosaic virus and its resistance to the disease.

Acres in the area were largely unchanged from the past couple years, but still some of the lowest acres in recent history. Sperber reports that they took in about 125 percent of normal receipts, due to the excellent yields.

“It was an excellent harvest,” he said. “It was about the fifth best total receipts in the 15 years I’ve been here, on some of the lowest acres.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 13 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Harvest continues to roll through northern Kansas as farmers try to pick up the pace to make up for some lost time. Yields continue to be highly variable throughout the state, with some areas seeing double the county averages, while others are making 25-30 bushels per acre. Pockets of protein continue to be reported in localized areas of the state.

Lynn Moore, a farmer near Pittsburg, finished wheat harvest about two weeks ago. Moore says they had solid yields throughout harvest, and test weights ranged in the upper 50’s.

“It was unexpected for wheat harvest to go as well as it did, but we are just glad it is done and out of the field,” Moore said.

Dell Princ, of Midway Coop Association in Osborne County, reported that they are in the final stages of their wheat harvest this year.

“These are some of the best yields we have seen, considering the year we have had,” Princ said. With solid test weights and proteins ranging from 11-11.5%, Princ is pleased with this year’s harvest.

Chris Tanner, a farmer near Norton, reported that he began his harvest on July 4th (when they normally finish up) but had to press pause for rains until July 12. He is currently about halfway done. He estimates that this year’s county average is in the mid-50s, with some acres seeing upwards of 90 bushels an acre, but others averaging only 25 bushels per acre. Tanner says that fertilized fields are yielding much better, and that proteins in the area are ranging from 10.5-11%. Test weights are 61-63 pounds per bushel. The Syngenta/AgriPro variety Bob Dole is performing very well for Tanner.

“Weather made it difficult to get wheat drilled, and a lot of guys got it in late,” said Tanner. “Spring moisture made it hard to get fertilizer on. Everything has been a fight for us — calving, spraying, planting and overly saturated soils.”

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 9 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Jerald Kemmerer, of Pride Ag Resources in Ford County, says that they are about 80-85% done with wheat harvest this year. With good looking tests weights and sporadic yields, they are still pleased with the wheat that they are cutting. “If mother nature would work with us, we could wrap up harvest this weekend,” says Kemmerer.

John Lightcap, of Offerle Coop Grain & Supply Co in Edwards County, said their wheat harvest is coming to an end for the year as long as the rain stays away. Lightcap says that he is pleased with the protein and test weight numbers that he is seeing in their crop. Harvesting at 3 different locations, they are seeing better protein numbers in northern fields. Being about 93% done with harvest, Lightcap believes that if the weather holds out they should be able to wrap up wheat harvest within the next four to five days.

Frontier Ag Inc. in Graham County is just getting the ball rolling with wheat harvest. Although the area is typically done by now, local farmers are just getting a good start this week. With the wheat that they have cut, they are seeing good test weights and average protein levels. They are hoping to continue on with wheat harvest and its above average yields as the week progresses.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

This is day 7 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Rain continued to be hit or miss over the holiday weekend. Many Kansas wheat farmers spent their Independence Day in the wheat field. Some areas in south central Kansas have finally wrapped up their harvest, but there are still a lot of acres left to cut in the rest of the state. While some areas in northwest Kansas have begun, they have been chased out of the fields by scattered storms. Localized rainfall amounts range from zero to more than 8 inches across the state. There is still green wheat in some areas as well.

Josh Debes, who farms near Hoisington, reported that, “with all things considered, late planting, hail damage and weed pressure, we’re pretty happy with this year’s crop.”

While yields are lower than the last couple years, they are in line with the 10 year average. Debes says they are down to their last 30 acres of wheat to cut, but with 2 1/2” of rain Saturday night and more expected Monday night, they won’t be able to finish those up for a few more days. Harvest began June 26, which is much later than normal. Josh and his wife Julia returned to the farm five years ago, and this is the first time they have even cut wheat in July.

Debes reported that test weights are holding up, with even the late planted wheat holding near 60. Even their rust resistant varieties had some rust in them this year, and there were drowned out spots and some late weed pressure. Damage from hail reduced yields in some fields. He said planting date was key; the late planted fields had yield reductions.

Brian Sieker, who farms near Chase, reported that it’s the tail end of harvest in his area. Western Rice County is nearing completion, but he has seen plenty of acres in Barton County that are waiting to be cut. Yields are highly variable, from 25-80 bushels an acre, and test weights are holding steady at 60-63 pounds per bushel. Sieker said that the area has seen damage from hail and flooding. While he doesn’t have exact numbers for his wheat, he has heard neighbors say that there are pockets of protein in the area where they have received a premium.

“We’ve had some good and bad surprises this year,” Sieker said. “But it’s something you just have to take in and learn from for the next year.”

Jason Ochs, who farms near Syracuse, said harvest is going really well this year. Their only problem is that they keep bumping into wet wheat, with some still testing as high as 18% this weekend. Scattered rains and wet ground have delayed harvest. Yields are about double their normal yields in the area, averaging 60-70 bushels per acre this year. Most of the area is about half to two-thirds complete with this year’s harvest. Protein is below average, and Ochs reports his protein is mostly ranging from 10-11%. Test weights for hard red winter wheat are holding up at 60-61, and hard white wheat is even higher at 63+.

The 2019 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. To follow along with harvest updates on Twitter, use #wheatharvest19.

A DTN report says any winter wheat that survived the growing season is likely looking pretty good come harvest time. However, field survival between planting and harvesting could be a little “iffy.”

A delayed harvest is finally getting underway in the Southern Plains.  “It’s been a trying year for producers, especially from April through harvest. It seemed like every night, the potential existed for us to lose the crop,” said Mike Schulte, executive director for the Oklahoma Wheat Commission.

Between the delayed planting and overwhelming amounts of rain, plus the typical spring and summer hailstorms, a lot of wheat fields were either left unplanted or lost altogether.

A Kansas State University Extension Wheat Specialist said the fields that did survive were able to benefit from plenty of soil moisture and below-average temperatures during the grain fill period. The biggest concerns this year was that the crop was so far behind in development during the spring that it was going to catch a lot of the summer heat during grain fill.

The crop has benefited from good weather, featuring near-perfect temperatures that stayed cool even into July.

Kyle Krier, a Kansas farmer, told DTN that the early-planted wheat is doing better than the crop that was late getting into the ground.